Here’s a roundup of some of what’s going on in the hockey world:

I’m a bit surprised we haven’t seen this one from Patrick Kane or Alex Ovechkin.

General Manager Jim Benning is on record as saying the Canucks still need a top six winger. This is not a shock to anyone given that their second and third highest scoring wingers last season didn’t even hit 40 points. Not surprisingly they were second worst in goals for last season with a flaccid 186 goals for the season.

Kirk Luedeke has a look at the impact of undrafted free agents in the Boston Bruins system.

The Franchise To Be Named Later headed for Las Vegas is supposedly held up, in part by the London Knights, a junior team, located half a continent away. Maybe, just maybe for future NHL expansion prospective team owners should have a list of names to hand in with the rest of the paperwork. Personally if they can’t settle up with London, maybe go with Nevada Nighthawks. Seriously, the CFL had two teams with the same name, and somehow we can’t have an NHL team and a OHL team with the same name? How does that work for the Rangers?

It still looks like Vladimir Sobotka should be back in the NHL this fall. The gritty forward has had two solid years in the KHL. Last year he finished second on his team in scoring, up from fourth in his first year playing in Europe.

Mark Giordano of the Calgary Flames gets some love, or at least respect out of Logan Couture of the San Jose Sharks.

So who is the best Nashville Predator? For my money, I want to see a full season of Subban and Johansen before I make up my mind.

Good-bye Antoinne, and hello Dylan, or maybe Christian, watching the Coyotes off season just got a bit more interesting.

The unrestricted free agent market tends to be where NHL general managers make their most interesting, and often fatal mistakes.  The right wings in this market represent a very strong crop. There are at least three who were in the top twenty for scoring at their position, some of whom were on pretty bad teams most or all of last season.

Jarome Iginla

While the entire Penguins roster evaporated in second round, and that might not give teams the greatest confidence in him, he did put up 10 points over his first twelve playoff games since 2009. In Calgary was a winger he took a lot of faceoffs and was at times their best man on the dot. Another seven million dollar a year contract is probably not in the cards, but two to three years at five per year is not an undue risk

Michael Ryder

The former Dallas Star, Boston Bruin and Montreal Canadien managed to tie for 14th in scoring for right wings with one of his teammates from the Stars, Jaromir Jagr. Not as physical as most forwards he still holds one of the fastest releases in the NHL. Most times when he gets his shot off there is no warning at all. At 33 he’s still young enough that if you believe he’ll stay healthy and motivated a five or six year contract is worth considering if you don’t want to deal with a roster spot for a few years.

Brad Boyes

Perhaps the most enigmatic UFA this year, Boyes is capable of outstanding offense, silly turnovers, sound but not stellar play in all zones, and being completely invisible. With 30% less games played than the previous year in Buffalo he put up 30% more points this season with the New York Islanders. It seems noteworthy that he’s been collecting more of his points of late as a setup man, so perhaps teams that have a shooting center versus a playmaker might want to sign the 31 year old, former 40 goal man.

Nathan Horton

Without even looking at his current skill set Horton is worth signing for two reasons that can contribute to his next teams success; he went high in the ultra-deep 2003 draft and he’s been part of a Stanley Cup win. Add in a willingness to play through pain, playoff experience as a top contributor, and having spent years at the bottom of the barrel to feed his hunger and you’ve got a compelling package. He’s still got his shot, he’ll play physically, has played at center in the past as well as his normal right wing slot. With the right linemates he’s still got thirty goal potential.

Pascal Dupuis

At thirty four having had his two best seasons in the last two years, its probably safe to call Dupuis a late bloomer. The forty five goals in just two years represent 25% of his career total in a career that is two games short of 800. The versatile Quebec native has a strong two way game, is a good penalty killer, plays on the penalty kill and has been pretty healthy throughout his career. A team willing do double his $1.5 million a year salary and sign him for multiple years is likely to end up with a guy who will be happy to sign and play hard every night.

David Clarkson

Speaking of late bloomers, the undrafted David Clarkson toiled as a bottom six player for years. Two seasons ago he gets elevated minutes in the wake of an unremitting string of injuries to the Devils forwards. How does he respond? He tosses up a thirty rack of goals. After that ‘fluke’ he put up fifteen goals in the lockout shortened season a stat in which he lead the Devils. At 29, he’s got several more good years left in him.

Teemu Selanne

While it is likely his list of choices this summer are A: return to the Ducks or B: Retire with maybe, just maybe C: play in Europe a distant third, no one expects Selanne to do anything but one of the first two options. Diligent general mangers will still place a call, but it should be regarded as strictly pro forma.

Jaromir Jagr

Anyone expecting the top flight goal scorer of ten or fifteen years ago is sorely out of touch. He is however a quality playmaker, almost immovable when he’s got the puck, and one of the most underrated passers in the NHL. On a team that gets a lot of powerplays he could be a difference maker. Seeing him dive into the pile to protect the net this post season should be enough to convince people he’s still playing because he’s hungry and not that he just doesn’t know what else to do with himself.

It’s that time of the season again when we need to take our first hard look at the NHL’s latest crop of wunderkids, studs, and future duds. Forwards, defensemen and goalies will be covered once more and compared to a well known NHL personality. This season the honor goes to the American Captain of last years Stanley Cup champions, Dustin Brown of the Los Angeles Kings. The perennial 20 goal man is different breed of player than past selections Eric Staal and Ilya Kovalchuk. Brown is known more for a physical style of play and two way play than either of the rookie watch alumni.

Dustin Brown:

  • Will play his 600th NHL game Monday night against conference rivals and playoff  sparring partners the Vancouver Canucks.
  • Has started off the season 0-1-1 and a -4 as the Kings remind everyone they partied like royalty all summer, and fall long and work through their Stanley Cup hangover 1-2-1.
  • The Kings sit in 12th place.
  • Brown has a team worst -4, trailing grinder Kyle Clifford by 10, and sophomore by 1 game Jordan Nolan by 8.
  • Has 9 hits, 1 blocked shot and just 7 shots on goal through four games.

Goalies:

  • No rookie goalies have played a game yet this season.

Defensemen:

  • Matt Irwin of the Sharks has been putting in work to the tune of 19:07 average TOI, and has picked up 2 points, including an even strength goal, half a minute of short handed time on ice, and an assist. On this his first tour of duty in the NHL, the 6’2 210 blueliner has handed out 6 hits and blocked 9 shots while doing his Hockey East and AHL experience proud. He’s second in rookie defensemen TOI and 3rd in scoring.
  • Dougie Hamilton of the Boston Bruins is showing no signs of the collective malaise that sank Team Canada’s World Junior Championship hopes. The offensive minded blueliner has already earned some penalty kill time under the very conservative Claude Julien. The 11 shots he’s dished out go nicely with the 8 hits and three blocked shots. The 19 year old has averaged just over 18 minutes a night and is currently second in blueliner scoring.
  • Brendan Dillon of the Dallas Stars may not have scored any points yet, but the 16 hits through five games, make it quite certain the squads from Chicago, Detroit, Phoenix, Saint Louis and Minnesota know who he is. Two blocked shots add to the collection of bruises, and it shouldn’t be all that surprising that he leads his team in hits.
  • Justin Schultz of the Oilers was the most talked about college player in the NHL as he wound down his Wisconsin career and spurning the Anaheim Ducks who drafted him. He’s now skating behind the Oilers plethora of young talents at forward and has rolled to the top of the rookie blueliner scoring. The 22 year old is sitting atop the TOI pile with an average of 24:02.
  • Brendan Smith of the Detroit Red Wings is jumping back into the NHL this season. How well his recovery from last years derailing via a concussion. The soon to be 24 year old is not the only rookie on the blueline, and is middle of the pack in ice time on a blueline that has already skated nine defensemen and is one of just three to skate all four games.

Forwards:

  • Cory Conacher is leading the NHL rookie scoring race as a center for Tampa Bay. The highly compact forward has about the best mentor for someone his size in the NHL playing with Martin St Louis. 2 goals 5 assists and a +4 through four games makes the former Canisius College player another undrafted player in the running to leave league GM’s scratching their heads for decades to come.
  • Tye McGinn’s two points through 3 games for the struggling Philadelphia Flyers has got to be more than some expected from the 119th pick in the 2010 draft. The Fergus, Ontario native who spent last year in the AHL potted just 18 points in 63 game. The rookie is tied in team points with Sean Couterier, Ruslan Fedetenko, and Luke Schenn, and doing it in just over 11 minutes a night.
  • Nail “I do a great Theo Impersonation” Yakupov has brought a great deal of larger than life personality to the Edmonton Oilers. He’s also managed to pack in two goals, one a powerplay tally. This years 1st overall selection has spent 3:19 a night on the man advantage for one half of the Battle Of Alberta.
  • Jonathan Huberdeau of the Florida Panthers much like his former Sea Dogs teammate Hamilton is off to a strong start. With 3 points in five games the former #3 pick is playing almost 16 minutes a night for the surprisingly struggling Sunrise squad.
  • Mikael Granlund of the Minnesota Wild is part of the avalanche of changes in this roster in the last year or two, and he’s popped in two points while earning more and more ice time. He started off at under 15 minutes and in his fourth game topped out at 18:30. The fancy Finn leads all rookies with an eye opening 56.4% faceoff win percentage.
  • Vladimir Taresenko is holding down a top spot with the Saint Louis Blues and is tied with Conacher for points, but has played one more game. The 21 year old Russian has been a big part of the Blues 4-1 start being even or +1 in all five games so far.

Worth watching:

  • Forwards: Mark Scheifele, Stefan Matteau, Sven Baertschi, Jakob Silfverberg.
  • Defensemen: Paul Potsma, Brian Lashoff, Mark Borowiecki, Korbinian Holzer, Patrick Weircioch

This feature will be run roughly every two weeks.