The Boston Bruins are one of the teams with the roughest salary cap position heading into the season. They’re going to have to move someone. Probably more than one someone. Why might the much respected Campbell be part of the departing parade? His value as a penalty killer, his leadership, and the fact that he does have a Stanley Cup right make him worth something. It might be a prospect with 2-3 years before they are NHL ready, or it could be a draft pick.

The most logical teams to land him are teams for whom the difference in their penalty kill last year might have meant either making the playoffs, or advancing once in. So which teams make the most sense? Here’s the short list:

  • Arizona Coyotes.
  • Minnesota Wild
  • New York Islanders
  • Nashville Predators
  • San Jose Sharks

The Coyotes finished last season just two points outside the playoffs with the 26th ranked penalty kill in the NHL. Even with their goaltending issues finding two to three more points with a penalty kill that didn’t suck would have put them in the playoffs.

The Minnesota Wild finished with 98 points and the first Wild Card position. As good as the rest of the team was, with Campbell taking penalty kill minutes from Koivu and Parise who were both playing over 20 minutes a night last season, where do they end up? Do they get enough more points to climb into the 3rd or even second slot in the ultra-competitive central division?

The Islanders are a conference rival, and made other moves to improve their team this off season. One more move that takes them from the second worst penalty kill to something respectable could be what it takes to make the last game in their current stadium a playoff game. There’s already been rumors of Johnny Boychuk going to Long Island, why not make it a package deal?

The Nashville Predators are desperate to get back to the playoffs. New head coach with a new attitude and a like of rugged players who play they game the right way, its a natural fit. The penalty kill prowess, and faceoff wins would almost be a bonus for Peter Laviolette. Maybe a prospect like Saku Maenalanen is the return?

For the San Jose Sharks who have little to no problems in the regular season, Campbell might just be able to help fix their postseason woes. Campbell played well in the Boston Bruins Stanley Cup Run, and could help solidify both the locker room and the post season shorthanded play.

The Boston Bruins have cut almost another dozen players from the roster.

Here’s the breakdown.

  1. Bracken Kearns was released from his PTO. He never looked great, but was shifty in traffic.
  2. Chris Casto, as a defenseman he was a long show, especially with high draft picks ahead of him.
  3. Jared Knight, ill luck in previous years made this his best camp, and he honestly looked good enough to make some NHL teams.
  4. Matt Lindblad, with three of the four left wing spots locked down and the fourth probable, he never had a good shot at making the team.
  5. Joe Morrow I like what I see, but the blueline is very, very deep.
  6. Seth Griffith, possibly the most surprising cut from camp. He looked great with Bergeron and Marchand, really nice hands.
  7. Brian Ferlin, good wide body. Not surprised he was cut, will be less surprised when he’s called up at some point in the future.
  8. Alex Fallstrom, didn’t show me much at camp.
  9. Tyler Randell, has to clear waivers, but not likely to be picked up.
  10. Ben Sexton, didn’t distinguish himself.
  11. Zach Trotman, again a victim of depth, and possibly lack of hope.

There are players on this list who are better than Gagne or Leino, I’m pretty amazed that both are still in camp, particularly Leino.

Its never a good thing when a team and player can’t manage to combine for the common good. Sometimes the player is a misfit, other times the teams flat fail to appreciate the talent of a player and put him in a role that bars him from success. Other cases are just a mismatch of player and system. Whatever the cause, there are several NHL players who could do so much better elsewhere.

Ryan Johansen – Columbus Blue Jackets

The Story:

Ryan Johansen and The Columbus Blue Jackets are in the end stages of a protracted, bitter, and public dispute over exactly what Johansen is worth for his second contract. Management is arguing that with only one season of notable performance he should take a more modest contract to prove last years 33-30-63 season wasn’t a fluke. The 22 year is likely pointing at other players with similar levels of success, who likely had more years with better rosters around them.

The most popular example is Ryan O’Reilly who in the final year of his entry level deal put up 18-37-55 in 81 games for the Colorado Avalanche. O’Reilly was rewarded with a contract worth $3.5m in year one and $6.5m for an average annual value of $5m. Ryan Nugent-Hopkins is another comparable, who ended up with a big contract with similar but lesser production. You can look at Tyler Seguin and Jeff Skinner as well, in the third year out of juniors Johansen was more productive or healthier than most of the comparables, in some cases both.

Evander Kane – The Winnipeg Jets

The Story:

Kane has more goals in the last three seasons than any other Jets player, one of those seasons included a coaching change in season. He’s played under four different coaches in five seasons; John Anderson, Craig Ramsay, Claude Noel, and Paul Maurice, given how different those coaches are in temperament, experience, and style it would be hard to fault Kane if he wondered if management and or ownership had a clue and a plan. Kane is a rugged winger (drafted center) who has played in all situations and even contributed shorthanded goals. He hits, blocks shots, and has averaged over twenty minutes a night the last two seasons, yet he’s still treated as some sort of leper by the team.

If some or even most of what is said about him off ice is true maybe they are just sick of dealing with that. No matter what the cause, Evander Kane trade rumors are frequent enough to not be news and he’s only entering his sixth year.

Mark Giordano – Calgary Flames

The Story:

Giordano is one of the rising stars of the NHL. On a pretty bad team last year, he none the less was voted one of the best NHL defensemen by the writers of NHL.com this year. With a very friendly salary of just over four million this year and next, he can be moved for a considerable return to a team like Philadelphia or the Islanders who want to win soon. Giordano is 31 which is not old for a defenseman, but it is highly doubtful he’ll still be near peak if and when the Flames acquire enough talent to be a contending team. Better still, with less wins and more picks, they stand a better shot at getting not only good building blocks, but someone at the top end of the next NHL draft.

Reilly Smith – Boston Bruins

The Story:

Reilly Smith is part of the return for the trade that sent Rich Peverley and Tyler Seguin to the Dallas Stars. He came in last year and cemented Seguin’s old spot on Patrice Bergeron’s line, and proved himself a good and willing passer and a goal scorer. With the cap crunch and a stagnating pool of NHL ready talent in the AHL, the Bruins have had little room and less inclination to sign him when cheaper options are at hand. Even if Smith is asking for a more than reasonable $2.25m, the team is likely to see him as replaceable and should part with him as soon as possible for as much as they can get.

Bruins Head Coach Claude Julien at Bruins Training Camp 09/20/14

Aside from David Pastrnak crumbling under light contact from a not very physical defenseman, camp was largely an exhibition of which pairings and trios acquired chemistry the fastest, and which people in the stands could survive the chill.

Bruins Head Coach Claude Julien at Bruins Training Camp 09/20/14

Bruins Head Coach Claude Julien at Bruins Training Camp 09/20/14

One of the more intriguing and yet low key battles is between former Dartmouth College forward Matt Lindblad and Michigan native, London Knight alumni Jared Knight. The two were paired against each other on day one and engaged in spirited but professional battles through drills and rushes. Day two, more of the same. It’s pretty close. Knight is more skilled. Knight’s shot has a better, more concealed release, and is a bit truer to the net. Lindblad is two years older, and has had better health over the last two years. Whoever comes out ahead in camp, team, players and fans win.

From the rest of camp:

Trotman: Ate Villie Leino a couple times on a drills and looked both good by himself and when paired with Bartkowski.

Khokhlochev & Eriksson watch Breen and others drill below the faceoff dots.

Khokhlochev & Eriksson watch Casto #65 and others drill below the faceoff dots.

Caron: Better day today.

Krejci and Caron eye up goalies and defensemen.

Krejci and Caron eye up goalies and defensemen.

Khokholachev: Deceptively agile and speedy, good hands, went around the enormous Breen and his reach to get off a shot with zero warning.

Alexander Khokhlochev watching drills.

Alexander Khokhlochev watching drills.

Bartkowski; Arguably the best defenseman at skating backwards in camp. Good speed and balance while he does it allowing him to turn in either direction as needed.

Griffith: Looked like he’d been playing with Bergeron and Marchand for a year during drills.

Subban: The new pads were repeatedly referred to as “Turco like” by various fans watching.

Malcolm Subban in his 2014 pads

Malcolm Subban in his 2014 pads

 

Morrow: Made a really nice backhand pass to McQuaid while both were moving at pace.

Matt Lindblad #52 and Ethan Werek #78 leave eyeball prints all over the rink.

Matt Lindblad #52 and Ethan Werek #78 leave eyeball prints all over the rink.

Lucic: Much more engaged today, accidentally took out both defenders during a two on two drill allowing Kelly to go five hole on the goalie.

Seidenberg #44, Cross #56, Lucic #17

Seidenberg #44, Cross #56, Lucic #17

Simonelli: Interesting resume, four years at Wisconsin, and some time on the US National Development team. both yesterday and today he was frequently paired with Seidenberg for drills.

Hamilton is pretty frequently seen watching the other session, usually while trying to hide.

Hamilton is pretty frequently seen watching the other session, usually while trying to hide.

Ferlin; Out-muscled Paille to get to a puck despite Paille having the inside position and a lower center of gravity. Did more than one drill with Lucic and looked like he could easily be part of more than one NHL team we could name.

Fraser #25 and Soderberg #34 size up the competition

Fraser #25 and Soderberg #34 size up the competition

Robbins: Made a really neat kick of a puck from the heel of his skate to the curve of his blade, made one or two other plays with his feet.

Robin, Batman

Day 1 is here.

The “hot” story of the day is the injury to 2014 1st round draft pick and budding hall of fame winger David Pastrnak. He and Bartkowski made contact during a drill, Pastrnak then made contact with the ice. He came in a scuffed third place in the affair. The hit wasn’t audible at ice level. Even if it were, its better to find out now than a couple weeks into the season when he’d have burnt his nine game tryout. These are exactly the same type of injuries that have already eaten a couple dozen games of the equally underdeveloped Ryan Nugent-Hopkins career.

Matt Bartkowski is an above average skater. He makes smart outlet passes. He occasionally is caught out of position.  In short, depending on the system he is somewhere between a seventh and fourth defenseman in the NHL. Some rough edges, some strengths and good fundamentals. What no one thinks of him as is a punishing hitter. When his career is all said and done he’s not going to be compared to Scott Stevens. It’d be pretty hard to compare him in terms of hitting to Alexi Emelin, Mark Stuart, or Dion Phaneuf.

Given what was said by Claude Julien via BostonBruins.com, its unlikely this is a serious injury. Any attempt to paint the hit or the injury in any other light should be taken with the sort of skepticism you’d reserve for hearing the NHL and KHL were going to merge and expand.

Lucic digging deep to stop outside the crease.

The best news is that just about all the guys were healthy. Adam McQuaid not only moved without restriction, he lacked the pain lines and strain fans had grown used to seeing on him. Chris Kelly looked to be not just back to preinjury form but possibly a half step faster. Dennis Seidenberg held nothing back and looked in one viewing to be back to preinjury for as well.

The pair skated together for at least one drill at Bruins training camp.

The pair skated together for at least one drill at Bruins training camp.

The good news is I think all the guys battling for a job in the NHL this year who were with the club last year, look like they came to win the job now. Brian Ferlin and Seth Griffith showed up and looked good, Jared Knight looks to have slimmed down and no longer looks like an NFL free safety, perhaps most surprisingly Simon Gagne looked not just healthy, but like he was still capable of holding down a top six position, at least with one viewing.

#54 is six foot five or so

0 #54 is six foot five or so

Perhaps the biggest positive surprise other than Gagne looking good was Matt Fraser. During one on one battle drills he was paired up against a reinvigorated Zdeno Chara and held his own both taking and receiving checks, while staying with the puck, or pressuring Chara when the Captain had the puck.

Bergeron and Julien plotting, planning and talking hockey,

Bergeron and Julien plotting, planning and talking hockey,

The bad news is who wasn’t on the ice; Greg Campbell. He was watching from rink side. Torey Krug and Riley Smith are somehow still unsigned. And at the bottom of the list was the unsurprising lackluster performance of two players; Jordan Caron and Ville Lieno. About the only positive to Leino being there was he did manage to get off a few shots from the seat of his pants or knees, which he ended on pretty regularly as everyone including Caron seemed to drop him with ease. Caron for his part looks to have lost a good deal of muscle, and was moving poorly, as in Recchi in his last three months before retirement poorly, short choppy steps and all.

#44 Showing all signs of good health.

#44 Showing all signs of good health.

One heartening bit for long term prospect watchers is that Tommy Cross looked the most quick and agile I can recall seeing him. While he’s got a whole mountain range to climb before getting a sniff at the NHL, he’s moving well enough not to be an instant liability when he hits the NHL stage.

#50 Knight and #52 Lindblad, two of the Providence Bruins competing for a Boston roster spot.

#50 Knight and #52 Lindblad, two of the Providence Bruins competing for a Boston roster spot.

Have you ever seen a magic show? David Blaine, Siegfried and Roy, or one of the others? A lot of how they do what they do is through distraction, misdirection, and convincing you what you are seeing is what they say it is. Often magicians will use smoke, mirrors, magnets and other inanimate props to direct your attention to what you think is the point you should be paying attention to. Other times they’ll have an inevitably attractive assistant parading around right where you can see and fixate on while the action is elsewhere.

That’s what’s going on with the Boston Bruins. In this case the lovely assistant is David Pastrnak. The surprise first round draft pick of the Boston Bruins was picked for his position, right wing, a slot the Bruins currently have zero point zero players who have succeeded at in a Boston uniform. First round picks, especially late round ones get hype all out of proportion with what they usually accomplish in the first two or three years post draft. In most cases that’s a trip back to juniors (like Hamilton), frequent injuries do to physical immaturity (see; Ryan Nugent-Hopkins), frequent time missed due to off ice issues (see Tyler Seguin), or as will likely be the case with Pastrnak, more time in Europe (see; Carl Soderberg).

So what is Pastrnak, who couldn’t do a single pull up at development camp three months ago, here to distract Bruins followers from? How about a summer where the most impacting actions the team took were chipping in to collectively grow Peter Chiarelli’s mustache. I mean its an impressive flavor saver given that he didn’t have it when the boys were ushered out of the playoffs by the Montreal Canadiens. But it doesn’t make up for the fact that one of the teams two 30 goal men from last year couldn’t even be tendered an offer. It doesn’t cover up the fact that the best offensive defenseman the team has seen in over a decade isn’t signed. Torey Krug not only led the whole team in playoff scoring he tied Norris Trophy winner Zdeno Chara in regular season scoring.

Reilly Smith who is hands down the best right wing that Patrice Bergeron has played with possibly since he teamed with Boyes and Sturm as a line is also not signed. If you’ve looked at the statistics from last year you know as well as the front office does that with Reilly Smith and Torey Krug unsigned and Jarome Ignila departed for the Colorado Avalanche, three of the top nine playoff point producers from last year are not on the roster. And let’s not forget the camp invites, Simon Gagne who has missed more time over the last four season than he’s played and Ville Leino who last year averaged 14:26 of TOI an didn’t net even a single goal in 56 games he found his way onto the ice. Neither of these guys can stay healthy and productive. How are they a benefit?

Who is going to replace their production? Are Kevan Miller and or Adam McQuaid going to morph into 10+ goal defensemen? Is Pastrnak really going to come in and put up 20 or more goals under Claude Julien as a rookie? If so he’d be the first to do it in a Bruins uniform. Seguin had 11 as a rookie, Kessel had the same number his rookie year. Unless I’m missing someone, the only rookie to crack 20 goals under Claude Julien is Blake Wheeler, who as a college player was older, larger, and more physically and mentally mature than Pastrnak.

Essentially this was a wasted summer. Neely and Chiarelli did their Rip Van Winkle impersonations while their cap crisis festered. Instead of moving players for value at the draft or early in free agency, they remained wedded to a stagnating roster. When finally they roused from a months long siesta they signed a guy with a full year left on his contract who has publicly stated that he wanted to stay in Boston more than once. They’ve also been very careful to tell us everytime they get near a microphone that Pastrnak could be on the roster opening night.

I’m not sure anyone paying careful attention believes that though. With Kessel, Seguin, Hamilton we were told over and over ‘… be given a chance to earn a spot’. The difference being, Peter Chiarelli and Cam Neely were trying to temper expectations and hence the follow on pressure for guys they were in excess of 90% certain were going to make the roster. They aren’t doing that, and one of the tell tales he’s unlikely to be on the roster this fall is the number on his jersey. He’s playing with 88 right now. In Europe he played as 96 Sodertalje SK. Eighty-Eight isn’t his year of birth, and is unlikely a preferred number as when Seguin came in wearing his preferred number.

The next clue is the number of prospects who are less expensive, more mature and seasoned in the North American style of hockey. To name a few those players are Fallstrom, Spooner, Griffith, Sexton and Knight. Those are just the right wings or guys who have gotten extended looks.  Not only has Pastrnak only played 47 games professionally in the last two years, he’s not played hockey at any level with the level of physicality to be found in the USHL, CHL, US college hockey or the AHL/NHL. He also hasn’t played a season anywhere near as long. With conditioning a definite negative, the team can either look forward to a series of penalties that are the result of being to tired to play the system or sitting him in the pressbox on a regular basis.

Not only does the evidence not add up to Pastrnak being locked into the roster for the Bruins, it does not point to the idea being even average in quality. So this year Pastrnak will likely play the lovely assistant, and maybe by next year he’ll have his own show.

It’s not a secret that I despise diving. I’ve written the odd piece on the subject, once or twice (ok so its actually an enormous bugaboo that I prattle on about pretty often ) and I’m pretty happy with the NHL finally taking steps to control the dippy soccer like behavior of some players and franchises.

Here’s the rule chance directly from NHL.com

DivingThe fact that coaches will now be fined is now more than ok with me.

So which players are most likely to deserve a fine this season?

  • Jeff Skinner, on the rare occasions the former figure skating star is on the ice he’s clearly auditioning for a post-hockey career in soap operas.
  • Alexandre Burrows, with Tortorella still at the helm Burrows might be kept in check, Willie Desjardins is an unknown, unlike the duly esteemed Alexandre Burrow.
  • Dustin Brown, he does many, many things right and is most regards a model player, on the other hand it certainly appears to the impartial observer that his skates come complete with a great deal of helium.
  • Sidney Crosby, while he tends to be more subtle about it than some players on this list, there’s no doubt “The Next One” has embellished more than his share of slashes, trips, and the rest.
  • Brad Marchand, while he’s pound for pound one of the stronger players in the game, you can tell when the other team gets in his head because he starts falling down a lot.
  • Martin Brodeur, legend he may be but if he were as weak as he appears every time an opposing player makes contact or near contact with him he’d never be able to scramble like he does.
  • Mike Ribiero, (this space left intentionally blank.)
  • Henrik & Daniel Sedin, the Swedish Swan-divers are almost as good at falling down and finding each other on the ice.
  • Carl Hagelin, has the speed to avoid pretty much any player in the NHL, but can’t seem to avoid sticks and other impediments that aren’t even there.
  • P.K. Subban, a guy with all the talent in the world who has been known to take the express elevator to the ice on a pretty regular basis.

I’m sure there’s one or two I missed, who would you add?

It seems every other blog post at the start of the season, the run up to the trade deadline, and again around free agency is deploring the plight of some franchise who is being strangled by the cap ceiling. Without even looking you can imagine all the articles on who the Chicago Blackhawks could have gotten if only they didn’t have “cap trouble”. You could probably while a away the entire off-season reading the articles decrying how cap trouble is depriving the Pittsburgh Penguins of the ability to (finally) find the right wingers to propel Sidney Crosby to his clearly fated 250 point season. You have a better chance of driving four consecutive Boston rush hours without seeing a moving violation than you do of not finding on average one post per site detailing how awful it is that the Bruins are being handcuffed by this contract or that and it being the cause of all their cap trouble.

You could rinse and repeat for all the other top ten teams to the salary cap. And that’s exactly what you should do. Wash your mouth out with soap and keep doing so every time you use the cop out of cap trouble to describe where a team stands or its current woes. Cap Trouble doesn’t exist. Management trouble is what you are talking about. Every front office in the league is working under the same ceiling.

How do teams get into this mythical place? Poor decisions by its leadership. In some cases players selected by a previous regime are still in place and those contracts are an anchor. The current CBA addresses that as well, in addition to the traditional buyouts teams were granted two get out of jail free cards handily labelled compliance buyouts that are perfect for jettisoning dead weight. Barring ownership interference, there’s not really any excuse for any General Manager or President to have a single contract they don’t want on their roster if they’ve been in their position more than four years.

Some of the sub-prime choices come as part and parcel of an inability to draft and develop talent. Here’s a hint; if your fanbase can’t identify three players drafted, developed and promoted to a spot in the roster where they succeed for each five years you’re in office, you probably are doing a poor job with at least one of the drafting or developing. Three should be regarded as minimum figure, especially if your team was bad in the early years of your tenure.

If you’re drafting and or developing poorly, you’re paying for it elsewhere. You’re either holding on to players past their usefulness, overpaying pending free agents to retain them or throwing cash at the free agent market like Mardi Gras beads. One of the cash equivalents that most just don’t pay enough attention to is the quantity of no trade and no movement clauses. If cash, readily replaceable is the equivalent of Mardi Gras beads, NTC’s and NMC’s are like diamond engagement rings, or maybe having a kid together. When more than a quarter of your roster has them you’re probably doing something wrong. If you get to one third or one half your roster, dust off an update your resume and remember where the file is, you’re gonna need it.

Another management failure that leads to misspending is undervaluing a player who fits right and then having to replace them because they refused to play at a Wal-Mart wage. Are some of those players overvaluing themselves? Absolutely, and those should be parted with, via trade if possible. But most, can be gotten back into the fold for about the fair market value for their talent. Free agents that you have to bid against the free market on the other hand almost always cost more than whoever they are replacing. Likewise, when you have to trade from a position of weakness to address a hole in your roster you will overpay unless you’re dealing with someone completely unimpeded by clue.

One last time: There is no such thing as cap trouble, there is only management trouble which influences the whole organization and how it spends money. If you think this post was written specifically about your own team, well, they probably were considered. But no, this is one of those trends in the NHL that reminds me of cars sliding uncontrollably across an icy surface at each other, it rarely ends pretty or with lots of smiles.