There are a number of teams with really good centers.

There are a number of teams who need good right wings.

Nearly every team is trying to keep their young lions in the minors or junior until  the expansion draft is a done deal.

Having watched Eric Staal’s career start circling the drain about three years ago, one has to wonder what the cause is:

  • apathy
  • cumulative injuries
  • playing (in Carolina) with a mostly AHL lineup
  • playing (in New York) under a coach who can’t or won’t make adjustments at any point after training camp

It is hard to say, but assuming he’s healthy and motivated, the best thing he could do would be to take a short money deal for one year to prove himself and maybe get another crack at the playoffs. On paper, barring the last couple seasons (and without the crippling price tag) he’s still a very attractive commodity. He’s big, he’s still got speed, he’s willing to hit, his shot is still something no goalie looks forward to having come at their head, and he’s free of a the types of injuries that make front offices panic.

Pushing his agent for a one year deal in a city with two or even three different style centers for him to play wing with would be the best situation. Assuming the Penguins had space Malkin, Crosby, and Staal on one team would be enough to make most defenses break before the midway point. So where are some spots that might be ideal for Staal?

  1. San Jose: The Sharks were in the finals for the first time in franchise history, adding a big body to play with on either of the top two lines would be an enormous boon.
  2. Arizona: The Coyotes missed the playoffs last year but have some incredibly talented youngsters on the roster. Domi, Duclair, and Staal could be dominant line. For a more veteran unit welding him to Vermette and Hanzal could be a very reliable two way line with more than a little offensive punch.
  3. Boston: With Bergeron, Krejci, and Spooner as the three top options at center, if Staal can’t regain his form here, he just needs to hang the skates up. The three play different styles and tempos and one would almost have to fit with one of them.
  4. Washington: Here Staal might just be a strong contender for a center slot in addition to his chances to play right wing opposite Ovechkin. Both Staal and Ovi are headed towards the end of their peak years, and the two together is something I don’t think many would want to defend.
  5. Nashville: Like Washington this might be a place for him to spend time at center and make big contributions. Laviolette would have to love the idea of Johansen and Staal dishing to Forsberg and Neal on two separate lines, or for that matter the four together as a high powered man advantage.

Wherever he sets his sights, he shouldn’t be aiming any higher than four million unless he’s just looking for an excuse to head to the KHL.

The Boston Bruins finished last season in one of the worst spots imaginable; too bad to be in the playoffs, and less awful than the lottery teams. They drafted in the murky middle, and don’t seem to have a plan. Who they drafted didn’t seem to address any needs, and given how close to drafted to the consensus for each position, it didn’t seem to be the result of any insight. They drafted a local boy who played a couple years with another local boy, from a local college. The home town picks of late remind me of the rampant homerism the Montreal Canadiens were indulging in around the time Louis Leblanc was drafted.

Right now their needs are even more pronounced now than at this time last year. Last year they had a healthy Loui Eriksson. Last year at this time they had hope for a rejuvenated Chara and Seidenberg. They had the promise of a purportedly healthy David Krejci. They even had somehow nurtured the belief Rask was an elite number one goaltender. Last year was awash in hope, including the hope of a brand new and invigorated General Manager, might point the rudderless franchise towards the rising sun of league relevancy.

Today, there is none of that. Tuukka Rask not only didn’t have an elite season, he finished behind twenty-six other goaltenders who played thirty or more games. That makes him far less than elite. Chara had several stretches of looking above average that were certainly heartening, but never showed his Norris form. Seidenberg widened his history of not playing well consistently with anyone on the roster. Krejci missed ten games and was had multiple weeks of being the third or fourth best center on the team.

What was done about an aggressively mediocre team? Did leadership say; This just won’t work, let’s flip as many players as we can for assets and rebuild? Nope. Did they add long term help? Again no. They voided their bowels on a several assets and downgraded to Jimmy Hayes from Reilly Smith, and brought in Liles who was aggressively inconsistent, and Stempniak who they could have had at the start of the season. Five draft picks, and a prospect to get two rentals. Essentially, they’ve done nothing positive in more than year. There were two agonizing highlights over the last year. At the top of the roster Marchand, Bergeron, and Eriksson had stunning and futile seasons carrying the team as high as they could. No one could ask more of them, and Eriksson can almost certainly go anywhere that can afford him after returning to the top of his form even while alternating between right and left wing and among lines. At the bottom of the roster Noel Acciari bringing a level of energy to the bottom six that might not have been eclipsed by anyone since P.J. Stock, and his penalty killing and defensive play were outstanding.

But it was all for nothing. The effort of the men assembled could not overcome the lack of talent in the roster. They need right wings desperately. After Pastrnak, the next best right wing is anyone’s guess and that’s not comforting. No one right now has any idea who the defensive pairs will be, or the backup, or the best winger not named Marchand. The two best defensemen heading for UFA status were had for less than trade chips than it took to get Stempniak and Liles, and either is worth more than both.

At the draft while everyone from the Panthers to the Coyotes was wheeling and dealing to get their team to a better place. What did the Bruins leadership do? Charlie Jabobs CEO of the organization walked on stage to make the first pick. They traded their seventh round pick for, a seventh round pick from someone who will almsot certainly have a better season next year and hence make the pick mean even less than the average late seventh rounder.

Boston Bruins fans should be aquiver with hope. Simply aquiver.