The New York Islanders did something today that they refused to do for a long time; they parted with prospects and draft picks. Playoffs or Bust has to be the mantra this year, and now they have the weapons to do it.

Nick Leddy has played all 258 of his NHL regular season games with the Chicago Blackhawks. Drafted 16th in 2009, Leddy has been with the Chicago Blackhawks through a Stanley Cup win, represented the USA in the Ivan Hlinka tournament and World Hockey U20.

The other half of the acquisitions of the day is the big bodied Boychuk. Johnny Boychuk has played over 300 NHL games, 4 of them for the Colorado Avalanche, and owns one of the hardest shots in the NHL. Known for physical play, and composed puck moving the defenseman also has his name on the Stanley Cup.

Combined the two represent $6,066,667 in salary added to the New York Islanders without Garth Snow giving up a single roster player. This is a serious amount of experiences minutes now in the capable hands of two quality defenders. There is now now excuse for the Islanders not to finish their last season in the old barn with a trip to the playoffs.

Every season there are players who because of injuries, changes in coaches, or family issues just fall off a cliff in terms of performance or their interaction with their team. The following year some players bounce back. In some cases it will take an additional year to get back to form, and some just never make it. This season there’s a handful of notable players who might just reclaim who and what they were.

Niklas Backstrm

Last year was the worst season of Backstrom’s professional career. He made it into only twenty one games. His record was a dismal 5-11-2, and the less said about his personal stats the better. Let’s not forget this is a Vezina quality net minder with a championship pedigree. What would a good season for Backstrom be? Sixteen post season wins would be great but first you have to get there. A thirty or more win regular season, and a save percentage .914 and up are more than possible with the team he has in front of him.

Loui Eriksson

The counterbalance to Tyler Seguin in a massive trade Eriksson had a 36 goal season on his resume when he arrived and managed to scrape together just ten in his first season in one of the most scrutinized hockey markets on the planet. Part of the problem was getting two concussions, one at the flying elbow of John Scott. Part of it was less minutes in a much more defensive system. This season he’s likely to be playing on the top line and the minimum Bruins fans will accept is a 25 goal 65 point season.

Mike Ribiero

An ignoble season playing for the Coyotes ended in him being bought out. It is arguable that his issues were a prime contributor to the Coyotes missing the playoffs. This season brings a news start for the 34 year old. The Nashville Predators extended him a one year contract and the opportunity to prove he can stick to irritating just his opponents.

Michael Del Zotto

Del Zotto is 24 year old USHL alumni who at the top of his game was over half a point per game. The young defenseman was sent to Nashville last season after starting his career with the Rangers. He was not retained. This year he’s on a defense that’s in flux and with more offensive upside than the Predators, and more structure than the current Rangers. A good season for Del Zotto is should see him back over the 25 point mark.

Dany Heatley

The Anaheim Ducks are the 33 year old’s fifth team. His goal production has been in decline the last few years. Part of that is undoubtedly the lack of a world class offensive minded center. Another part has been nagging injuries and the inevitability of Father Time leaning on him. With either Getzlaf or Kesler up front and Fowler and Lindholm moving the puck on the backed there’s a chance of him reversing his declining numbers. Improving on last years -18 and just 12 goals shouldn’t be too much of an issue, a 30 goal season may still be possible. Among other positive elements are getting to play with fellow former Minnesota Wild Clayton Stoner.

Watching the NHL always provides surprises. There’s always one, maybe two teams that make the playoffs or go on runs. But there are some things that are pretty easy to predict.

10:

A healthy Anton Khudobin plays more games for the Carolina Hurricanes than Cam Ward. Just look at the numbers. Even with Jordan Staal healthy the talent pool in Carolina remains too shallow to carry a much loved goalie who hasn’t been in the top third of the league in a while. Sorry, but the Canes are going to have actually focus on the back half of the ice this year to have a hope of keeping the team out of the lottery.

 

9:

Top flight players in ‘small’ markets will be overlooked for award recognition. Alex Pietrangelo, Shea Weber, Mikko Koivu, and others can look forward to another season of being ignore with superior play than guys who play in Toronto, Montreal, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, or New York.

8:

A team or teams that spend money and worry on their powerplay but not on their penalty kill will roll through the regular season and get punched out of the playoffs early by a team with the opposite imbalance.

7:

Players who skate with their heads down and get laid out by good clean hits will be defended by people who think that collision sports are a danger free where no one bears any responsibility for their own safety.

6:

A variety of media manufactured crises. Take a long hard look at good hard hits, the way hybrid icing and rules to cut back on fighting have been implemented that’ll be next as guys and gals who take a month and four days to recover¬† from stubbing their toes tell grown men what’s unsafe for them.

5:

A really early leak of the next Winter Classic game, complete with teams who have already played in an outdoor game.

4:

The trade deadline will come and go with enormously more hype than movement. One, maybe two players who are in the top 50 or 60 in their position will be moved and people will go spastic making comparisons to “huge” trades in recent years.

3:

Don Cherry and whoever his cohost is will continue to mutter inane things while hockey pundits who don’t understand the game feign shock and outrage over things that have been said approximately elventybillion times

2:

The music acts chosen to perform at NHL events will be anything but the American mainstream the league bends over backwards to attract but who aren’t really interested anyway.

1:

Reputation calls will still occur far to often on the ice.

The most commonly projected rosters for the Boston Bruins had the team with as little as $410,000. That’s not even enough room to call someone up for an injury or illness situation that doesn’t require a player being put on the long term injured reserve.

The rumored cuts include. Ryan Spooner, Alex Khokhlachev, Justin Florek, and Jeremy Smith, aka the skill guys. Among those retained on the Boston roster are Jordan Caron, Bobby Robbins.

Why?

Cash Rules Everything Around Management, this year each player and what they make:

  • Jordan Caron $600,000
  • Bobby Robins $600,000

vs.

  • Ryan Spooner $760,000
  • Alex Khokhlachev $786,687

No, don’t bother to do the math, that’s $1.2m versus $1,546,687 and a savings of $346,687 and brings the team to roughly $756,687 under the cap.¬† We know there’s a skill difference. We know this may not be the opening night roster.¬† If we’re going to be honest Jeremy Smith is fighting with the currently injured Adam Morrison for the fourth best goalie in the Bruins system and he’s probably never going to play for the Boston Bruins in the regular system.

Is $756,687 a lot of cap space? No. Is the increase of less than $350,000 in space huge? Not really, it does allow for a few extra days of a call up though. Would Ryan Spooner, Alex Khokhlachev and Justin Florek being playing full time in the NHL in other franchises? Yep, at least 15 or so. The first two would likely have made it last year, and Florek would probably still have made it in full time via injuries at some point.