While the off season isn’t over, the Tyler Seguin for Loui Eriksson trade currently lays claim to the biggest move off the offseason that isn’t a buyout.

The Who’s:

From Boston: Tyler Seguin RW/C, Ryan Button D, Rich Peverley F.

Peverley is the joker in this deck, undrafted he clawed his way into the NHL getting onto the Nashville Predators before moving onto the Atlanta Thrashers where he toiled until being traded to the Boston Bruins. A career .56 ppg, he’s carved out a job for himself as strong two way forward, top penalty killer and a guy who can play up and down the lineup.

Button is a young defeenseman with good agility, good hand eye coordination, and above average agility. Unfortunately the Bruins system is stuffed with defenseman, Krug and Bartkowski’s emergence at the end of the season and in the playoff run have already pushed Ference out, so this likely means

Seguin is the acknowledged biggest star in the deal. He was the first return in the Kessel trade, 2nd overall selection in the draft, and someone greatly appreciated by aesthetics. His speed puts him in the top 2-3% of the NHL, his release is reminiscent of Michael Ryder and other players with an elite release. He spent most of his junior career at center and his NHL career at right wing.

 

From Dallas: Loui Eriksson W, Joe Morrow D, Reilly Smith RW, Matt Fraser W,

Joe Morrow is perhaps the most intriguing person in this trade, certainly of those exiting Dallas. Last spring at the trade deadline he was traded for Brendan Morrow from the Pittsburgh Penguins to the Dallas Stars. With two trades in less than four months you can either take the stance that he’s really well regarded and has to be pried out of teams hands, or that he’s got issues that make organizations want to get rid of him. The 2011 draft saw him taken as the 10th defenseman and 23rd overall.

Reilly Smith the former Miami of Ohio star led the team in points in his final season, and was third in his second season. Also on the roster was Providence Bruins star Carter Camper. He’s a bit smaller than average, and a left shooting right wing with a big time shot.

Matt Fraser is another right winger signed as a UFA by the Dallas Stars, Fraser split is WHL career between the Kootenay Ice, and his hometown Red Deer Rebels. His Junior’s career featured three seasons with over 100PIMS. His professional career split between the AHL and NHL doesn’t seem to have that much edge to it as they Stars gave him 45 seconds of powerplay time this season.

Loui Eriksson is confirmed winger who plays both right and left. He’s got a career .71ppg on a team with so-so centers, he’s the owner of a 36 goal season. Eriksson plays in all situations, and produces points on the powerplay and while shorthanded. Hardly he NHL’s most physical forward his international career shows he’s got a certain comfort level with big game situations. There are three seasons left on his contract.

What it means:

For the Dallas Stars they get two guys who have played center, when you add this to their acquisition of Shawn Horcoff it says they don’t intend to be mediocre. They’ve acquired a high end player in Tyler Seguin and a respected veteran in Horcoff, the Stars want strength at center. Button gives them some flexibility for blueline depth, and Peverley and Seguins speed combined can shift whole games.

For the Bruins, they get a ton of cap relief, a winger more mature and more consistent than Seguin who is also a firmly established two way player. Morrow is the second of the top defenseman taken in the 2011 draft the Bruins have acquired along with  their own selection Hamilton. This is another of Chiarelli’s trademark depth and versatility moves.

Winner? Ask in five years. For now the Stars have completely revamped their center position. The Bruins got what they wanted, depth, versatility, and a player who shows maturity now and commitment in all three zones. The Stars will likely improve over last year and name recognition, the Bruins got some natural right wings their system lacked. If both teams got what they want, they both, provisionally, win.

 

No team wins without at least one very good center, most teams have more than one. In no particular order.

 

Derek Roy (age 30): While the last year or two have not been his best, he did get the extra rest of the lockout, and an unimpressive playoff run with the Vancouver. At 5’9″ and 184 lbs he’s not quite imposing, but has in the past managed to be effective against defenses like Boston and Montreal.

Michal Handzus (age 36): Probably the strongest faceoff man available in this free agent crop he’s also shown there is still gas in the tank playing 15 games in is native Slovakia, the bulk of the season with the San Jose Sharks before being swapped for a fourth round pick to the Blackhawks. In 23 playoff games Handzus put up 11 points while averaging about 16 minutes a night. Arguably he’s the best 2/3C available.

Mikhail Grabovski (age 29): The Maple Leafs somehow came to the conclusion Grabovksi was no longer needed, and that the team would be better off playing him to go away. On the ice Grabovski is aggressive, physical, impossible to intimidate and has produced three 20 goal seasons during his Maple Leafs tenure topping off at 29. Even with somehow landing in Randy Carlyle’s during the regular season and playing just 15:34 in the regular season his “poor play” got him burdened with additional minutes pushing him to 19:03 per game in the playoffs.  So in the break down between the stats guys, and the independent “eyeball test” guys, and the teams evaluation you can decide who you want to believe.

 

Mike Ribeiro (age 33) : While playing with the restructuring Washington Capitals under first year head coach and hall of fame inductee Adam Oates Ribeiro put up one of two point per game seasons in a NHL career that stretches back to 1999-2000. The former Montreal Canadien, and Dallas Star got into his first NHL fight with the Bruins Brad Marchand last season. Not the oldest center available, but certainly showing he’s willing to learn a few new tricks.

Tyler Bozak (age 27): Perhaps the most derided player on the list, Bozak plays with high energy, played the regular season at over 20 minutes a game, and the post season at almost twenty two. Last seasons short handed TOI was about triple the previous years. There aren’t a lot of younger centers available. and a general manager and coach that think they can get him for the right price and develop him

Danny Briere (age 35): Briere is among the legion of players signed to long term deals in Philadelphia and either traded or bought out. Small, a bit dirty and perhaps losing a step of late. While hes probably due for a significant pay cut, there’s no question his playoff prowess is more than tempting; 108 games played and 109 points, 50 of them goals.